Best Hair Cutting Techniques - The Ultimate Guide [62 Free Videos]

Haircutting takes an incredibly long time to master and requires constant education! In the Ultimate Video Guide to the Best Haircutting Techniques, we have hand-selected many of our favorite videos that we believe will elevate your haircutting skillset to another level.

We first build strong Foundations, then work into the essential art of Layering, and add the finishing touches with Face-Framing and bangs. We encourage you to grab a mannequin and work along hands-on with the videos whenever possible to really anchor your learning. Also, we would love to hear from you on our social media platforms if you feel that this guide is helping you.

Hair Cutting Guide Overview:

1. The Foundations of Hair Cutting
Master the foundations of hair cutting to become better at understanding the what, how and why behind cutting hair.
17 video techniques
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2. Layering Techniques
These layering techniques will set you up for success no matter the hair type or density.
20 video techniques
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3. Face-Framing Techniques
Discover multiple ways to approach face-framing in this video series.
9 video techniques
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4. How to Cut Bangs
There are many ways to cut a fringe, so why not learn them all?
16 video techniques
View Videos >


1. The Foundations of Hair Cutting

Ownership over the Foundations of Haircutting opens up limitless creativity and flexibility in your hairdressing. By truly understanding the concepts of Elevation, Overdirection, Finger Angle, etc... you take the guess work out of adapting haircuts to the needs of your salon guests.

Regardless of how creative you get with your haircuts, they are still controlled by the foundational basic principles contained in this portion of our video guide.

1. Elevation: Controlling the Vertical Movement of Hair
2. Over-Direction: Controlling the Horizontal Movement of Hair
3. Finger Angle: Creating Depth Within a Haircut
4. Sectioning: How To Section Hair with Precision and Accuracy
5. Tension: How To Maintain Tension When Cutting Hair
6. Layering Hair: The Difference Between Horizontal and Vertical Layering
7. Haircut Guides: How To Establish a Safety Guide When Layering Hair Above the Ears
8. One-Length Haircut: How To Hold Sections to Create a Consistent Line
9. Precision Haircut: How To Create a Precise Bottom Edge When Cutting Hair
10. Layering Hair: Creating Consistent Weight Balance Within Layers
11. Cross-Checking: The Importance of Cross-Checking Hair & How To Do It
12. Layering Hair Around The Face Without Creating Bulk or Holes
13. How To Create V-Shaped Layers Around the Face for Longer Hair
14. Cutting in Motion - Shear Entry Angle and Timing/Speed
15. Foundations of Layering Hair - 3 Different Elevations and How They Effect Weight Balance
16. 4 Ways to Add Texture to Blunt Haircuts
17. How To Point Cut Like a Pro


Elevation: Controlling the Vertical Movement of Hair

Foundations of Hair Cutting - Elevation

Mastering the art of elevation is guaranteed to improve your haircuts because it allows you to change the silhouette vertically.

It doesn’t matter if you’re in a horizontal, vertical or diagonal section, you must be moving the hair up and down, not side to side, in order to create elevation.

Want to collapse the shape at the bottom and leave weight at the top? Elevation allows you to do that.

Let’s say that all of your lengths are sitting at the same point. You’ll have a lot of density at the bottom, right? Now let’s say you want to move that density away from the perimeter and build it up and away from the head shape.

Simply start elevating the hair up and away from the head, but remember that once you lift the hair past 90 degrees you’ll allow more length to drop out toward the perimeter and take more length away from the upper surface. We encourage you to watch the video above to learn more about how elevation can improve your game.

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Over-Direction: Controlling the Horizontal Movement of Hair

Hair Cutting Foundations - Over-Direction

Over-direction is key to creating memorable haircuts because it creates weight and length in different directions and lets you control the side-to-side or front-to-back aspect of your silhouette.

You can move the hair three ways to produce different results. Over-direct the hair forward to create length and density toward the back of the hair. Over-direct the hair back to create movement, density and weight in the front. Or cut the hair at the natural fall to create no movement in either direction.

Three different haircutting guides (stationary, traveling and visual) also deliver different results, from the maximum amount of over-direction to a softer buildup of weight. Watch the video above to see exactly how it’s done.

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Finger Angle: Creating Depth Within a Haircut

Hair Cutting Foundations - Finger Angle

Finger angle influences the outcome of your haircuts because it creates depth within the section even if you’re using the same elevation and the same over-direction.

In a vertical section, finger angle affects the silhouette up and down. Within a horizontal section, finger angle controls movement away from the face or toward the face.

Want more fullness toward the perimeter? Use a finger angle diagonally away from the head shape. Want depth to fall toward the back of the head? Shift your fingers into a diagonal finger angle where it’s shorter towards the face and longer away from the face. Watch the video to be on your way to creating intricate shapes and adapting your haircuts to any client who walks through the door.

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Sectioning: How To Section Hair with Precision and Accuracy

How to section hair with precision and accuracy

Practice makes perfect, or at least perfect partings. Want to get really skilled at creating clean partings? Practice these three tips until they become second nature.

Connect your fingers: Our long cutting comb has a parting tooth at the top. Place your pointer finger at the tip of the parting tooth, take your other finger and place it where you want to go and connect the two points.

Comb the hair in the direction you want to part so you’re not fighting the grain.

Use both hands for really long partings. Put both fingers on the parting tooth and rest your palms against the head for support to create clean, clear lines. Watch the video to see how it’s done.

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Tension: How To Maintain Tension When Cutting Hair

How to maintain tension when cutting hair | Foundations of Hair Cutting

Want more precise results on your next haircut? Maintaining nice, even tension can help.

Start by asking yourself these questions? Is your tension even from top to bottom? Cutting past the first knuckle can be problematic so avoid it if you can.

Are you rolling the section to see it better or to get it into a different cutting position? If so, be careful that you don’t increase elevation. Keep a flat surface.

Remember that a loss of tension or uneven tension can complicate your haircuts so watch the video to learn more.

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Layering Hair: The Difference Between Horizontal and Vertical Layering

The Difference Between Horizontal and Vertical Layering for Haircuts

Rethinking your approach to haircutting can make the difference between a good haircut and a great haircut. Understanding when to use vertical layering and when to use horizontal layering is a good example. The difference is how the weight is distributed and how visual the cutting line is.

Want a softer edge and not as much weight? Take a vertical section, elevate the hair to 90 degrees and cut straight across. Want a lot of texture? Use your shears to create deep peaks and valleys that will soften as they fall.

Want to keep more weight through the perimeter and have more visual impact? Switch to a horizontal layering pattern. Same elevation, same over-direction but in a horizontal section. Watch the video for tips you can start using today.

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Haircut Guides: How To Establish a Safety Guide When Layering Hair Above the Ears

How to establish a safety guide when layering hair above the ears

It’s always challenging to know where to start your guide for layers to avoid the always-feared hole above the ear. The trick is to find a safe point to start your layers, and we’ve got a tip that works every time.

Go to the top of the ear. The area of the hairline that has to travel the farthest to touch the perimeter is that little piece at the high point of the ear. Never go shorter than that piece of hair and you’ll avoid the dreaded hole above the ear. Watch the video to learn how to find that safe point and preserve density and length.

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One-Length Haircut: How To Hold Sections to Create a Consistent Line

How To Hold Sections to Create a Consistent One-Length Haircut

There’s nothing wrong with an asymmetrical bob unless that wasn’t the look you were going for. Creating a consistent line on both sides of any one-length haircut is always a challenge, but we’ve got some solutions.

Your fingers can get you into trouble because they tend to create a slightly diagonal line when you use them as your guide. Instead, use your comb to guide the bottom of your fingers to create a horizontal line.

The other problem is your elbow, which wants to drag you down and throw off that nice horizontal line. Again, use your comb to help you out. Watch the video to see exactly how to create a consistent line each and every time.

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Precision Haircut: How To Create a Precise Bottom Edge When Cutting Hair

How to cut hair straight | Creating a precision bottom edge

Creating a precise bottom edge is all in the details. Cutting hair as close to the natural fall as possible will eliminate some of the inconsistencies. When you use your fingers to control the shape, be careful not to lift the hair up and away, which introduces elevation.

The best advice is to keep your hands out of the hair if possible. Using a comb instead puts less tension and stress on the hair and makes it easier to keep the hair in its true natural fall position.

We also suggest that you bring the shears in and cut at the bottom edge of the guideline rather than on top to make sure the next section that comes down isn’t above your previously cut section. Watch the video to learn more.

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Layering Hair: Creating Consistent Weight Balance Within Layers

Creating consistent weight balance while layering hair

A common problem with layered haircuts is inconsistency within the weight balance. We suggest that you examine the element of elevation because that’s one of the key ways to control the shape of the layer.

Taking sections that are too large can create inconsistency. Sub-sectioning those larger sections into two smaller pieces makes it easier to control elevation.

The other issue is body position. Usually your elbow-down side will be your heavy side and your elbow-up side will be your lighter side. Watch the video to see how maintaining proper elevation can make all the difference..

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Cross-Checking: The Importance of Cross-Checking Hair & How To Do It

Importance of Cross-Checking Hair

Cross-checking is one of those fundamentals you learned in beauty school that can save you time and improve your results. Even if you’re in a hurry, don’t skip this important step because it keeps you from getting ahead of yourself and finding out too late that you’ve started to make mistakes within the haircut.

The trick is to take nice clean sections and elevate the hair back to the position you cut it in before looking for problems. Work with a sense of purpose and look for balance within the line in both vertical and horizontal sections. Watch this video to discover how cross-checking affects the outcome of your haircuts.

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Layering Hair Around The Face Without Creating Bulk or Holes

Layering Hair Around The Face Without Creating Bulk or Holes

Don’t you hate it when you’re layering hair around the face and you get a hole right in front at the bottom corner? The trouble is in the recession area, and we’ve got two options to help you avoid the problem. The first one is to detach the hair that sits right over the top of that recession area from the length of your layering.

The second option is to grab your Professional Blending Shear, which lets you gently reduce the weight of the hair that sits in front of the weak area of the recession without overdoing it. Watch the video and see how it’s done.

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How To Create V-Shaped Layers Around the Face for Longer Hair

How To Create V-Shaped Layers Around the Face for Longer Hair

Here’s a fresh technique to add face-framing layers to the hair. Start at the high point of the head and connect to the point where the hair becomes weak behind the ear. Repeat on the opposite side.

Part off the upper surface of the head and grab your Professional 7” Dry Cutting Shear. Over-direct everything forward with 90-degree elevation. Determine where you want your shortest point to fall and cut a V-shape into that section.

Bring the sides down, maintaining 90-degree elevation and over-directing straight forward. Connect the longest point of your V-shape on the top out to the lengths on the perimeter. Watch the video and master this relatively simple technique.

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Cutting in Motion - Shear Entry Angle and Timing/Speed

Cutting Motion

Cutting in motion techniques, including slide cutting, slicing, channel cutting, slithering, and pinching and talking, are essential skills for every stylist’s toolbox. These haircut techniques allow you to quickly remove bulk and add movement to the hair.

When cutting in motion, it’s important to consider your shear entry angle to create the end results you want. A nearly-parallel shear angle will result in soft, subtle layers, while a more pronounced shear angle will remove more hair for a bolder look.

Timing is also critical for creating a great forward motion haircut. The speed at which the shear moves through the hair and the speed at which the shear closes both affect the final result. Closing the shear too slowly or too quickly (relative to your cutting speed) can shred the cuticle and create straw-like ends. The Sam Villa Artist Series 6” Slide Cutting Shear makes motion cutting easier by pushing hair out as the blades close, creating beautiful soft edges that blend seamlessly.

Cutting in motion is a must-know haircut technique for many of today’s top trending styles. With practice, you can learn to motion cut with confidence and control. When you choose the right angle and master the rhythm of gliding and closing your shears, you open up a whole new world of creative possibilities. Watch this video to upgrade your motion cutting skills!

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Foundations of Layering Hair - 3 Different Elevations and How They Effect Weight Balance

Foundations Layering Hair

Want to create better layered haircuts? It all starts with understanding the foundations of layering hair, such as levels of elevation and weight balance. Many of us tend to stick to one preferred type of elevation, but having a variety to choose from helps you design the perfect hairstyle for each individual client.

In this video, Sam Villa Education Director Andrew Carruthers walks you through 3 different levels of elevation. Grab your Lydia Mannequin head and follow along!

First up is a classic high elevation, also called 90 degrees vertical, which involves elevating a section straight up towards the ceiling. Lift the hair up and cut a blunt line that is parallel to the floor. This basic elevation technique delivers beautiful blended layers that have less weight on top and more density at the perimeter. Your guests who want soft, subtle texture will love this look!

For balanced layers and a round shape that follows the head, elevate the hair at 90 degrees to the head shape. Using a longer shear (we recommend the Sam Villa 6.25” Streamline Series Shear for layering), cut the section parallel to the head. Continue to adjust the elevation to maintain a 90 degree angle as you work down the hair from top to bottom, following the natural curve of the head.

Watch the video to discover the third elevation (hint: it’s perfect for keeping weight in the upper layers). Once you add these three elevations to your hair design toolkit, you’ll know exactly what to reach for to create gorgeous short and long layered haircuts!

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4 Ways to Add Texture to Blunt Haircuts

Add Texture to Blunt Haircuts

Highly textured, layered hairstyles are trending right now... but how can you add texture to a blunt haircut? When you’re faced with a heavy perimeter, there are several options for creating movement and visual interest. The tool and technique you choose should depend on your desired result as well as your guest’s hair type.

Point cutting is a great way to create a blunt cut with textured ends. For subtle texture, align your shear angle with the grain of the hair. Cutting against the hair grain will create bold, chunky ends.

You can also point cut into the hair with the Sam Villa Signature Series Invisiblend Shear. The weight removal is super-delicate so you never need to worry about removing too much hair. This technique is perfect for creating soft, light texture.

If your goal is to remove bulk without creating textured ends, consider slide cutting. Working from the interior of the hair allows you to control where you want to take out weight. Align your Sam Villa Artist Series 6” Slide Cutting Shear with the grain of the hair for natural texture (or place the blades at an angle for more visual interest), point the blades down towards the floor, and slide down small pieces of hair from mid-shafts to ends.

Want to remove weight without creating any visible lines or changing the perimeter? Watch the video to discover the fourth texturizing technique (your texture-shy guests will LOVE it). No matter which technique you choose, being intentional about the entry angle of your shear relative to the grain of the hair is key to creating beautiful textured blunt cuts!

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How To Point Cut Like a Pro

Point Cut

Point cutting is a wonderful technique for adding softness to haircuts, but it can cause injury to your hands and fingers when done incorrectly! Luckily, with the proper technique you can create beautiful texture without hurting yourself.

The secret to preventing cuts is to pull the shears away from your hand as you close them. When you point cut, open the shears, touch your hand gently, and close them on the way out. Practice this rhythm (“Open, touch, close on the way out”) at home, working slowly until you build confidence and muscle memory.

When point cutting hair, it’s important to consider the depth of the cut and the shear angle. A longer shear like the Sam Villa Signature Series 7” Dry Cutting Shear allows you to point cut deep into the hair. To add soft edges to a fringe or perimeter, point cut only the ends of the hair.

The angle of the shear in relation to the hair determines the type of texture that you create with your point cut. If the shear is roughly parallel to the grain of the hair, it will remove less hair and give you a soft, wispy finish. For more visual texture, place the shear at a diagonal angle to the grain of the hair.

With practice, you’ll learn to play with depth and cutting angle to achieve the exact results you want. Watch the video to learn how to point cut hair safely and effectively!

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2. Layering Techniques

Without a doubt, the most common technique we apply in commercial haircuts is layering. From short and highly textured to long and flowing, layers bring life and movement to your designs. But, we can easily get stuck in a rut of doing the same layering patterns over and over again.

Within this section of our video guide, you will not only learn how to have better control over layers but also discover creative options and solutions to common challenges faced behind the chair.

1. How To Cut Layers In Stick-Straight Hair
2. How To Create Visual Interest & Dimension In Long Hair
3. Creating Layers in the Crown with a Twist Cutting Technique
4. Ombre Layering Technique: A Layering Technique for Longer Hair
5. The Easiest Way To Cut Long Layers Throughout The Hair
6. How To Add Layers Without Compromising the Perimeter
7. How To Create Volume in the Crown: Cutting Soft Layers in Longer Hair
8. How To Cut Layers Without Making Them Look Choppy
9. How To Cut Even Layers When You Wear a Deep Side Part or Side Sweeping Fringe
10. How To Keep Layers Balanced
11. How To Create Shorter Layers with Movement in the Crown Using a Diamond Section
12. Disconnected Layers: Remove Bulk, Keep Length and Speed Up Blow Drying Time
13. How To Add Volume in the Crown Without Any Visible Layering
14. How To Cut Layers Into Dry or Coarse Hair
15. Using Triangle Sections to Layer Hair and Create Hidden Volume
16. How to Create Internal Graduation on a Blunt Bob to Collapse the Perimeter
17. How to Create Seamless Layers on a One Length Bob
18. How to Create Invisible Layers or Internal Layers
19. How to Create Invisible Layers - Zigzag Underlayering
20. How to Create Volume and Movement in Fine Hair
21. Two Ways to Fix Choppy Layers


How To Cut Layers In Stick-Straight Hair

How To Cut Layers In Stick-Straight Hair

Create a nice sense of looseness in stick-straight hair by adding layers. A trick that works every time? Fanning and point-cutting.

Simply pick up a section, overlap your fingers, fan the section, come in and chunk out your layers. Once you create the desired degree of chunkiness, readjust and go deep into the section. Remember to keep your blade parallel with the hair shaft and allow the fan to move while the shear continues to open. Watch the video to learn how to master the technique.

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How To Create Visual Interest & Dimension In Long Hair

How To Create Visual Interest & Dimension In Long Hair

It’s always a challenge to get dimension into long, thick hair, especially because clients worry that the ends will feel too thin. The key is to take vertical, pie-shaped sections on the upper surface to create a detached overcut.

Remember to put the wide part of your pie-shape on top so you don’t take density out of the perimeter. Cut a strong inverted line from short to long using the Professional 7” Dry Cutting Shear, which is designed to trap that heavier, thicker hair as you work. Watch the video to learn how to add fresh new dimension to long hair and win kudos from your clients.

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Creating Layers in the Crown with a Twist Cutting Technique

Creating Layers in the Crown with a Twist Cutting Technique

When you want to create layers and texture through the crown area, try twist cutting. Just take a section and twist it around the outside of its natural position to increase elevation and over-direction on the outsides of that section. After sectioning the hair to create a diamond shape that encompasses the whole crown area, elevate the hair diagonally right off the crown, over-directing everything into the center of the section.

Once you’ve established the twist, remove the length by cutting on a diagonal finger angle. Elevation, over-directing and twisting creates a blunt line that falls soft and loose, adding nice texture through the crown. Watch the video to master the technique for yourself.

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Ombre Layering Technique: A Layering Technique for Longer Hair

Layering Technique for Longer Hair

Looking for an innovative new cutting technique to create excitement in the salon? Allow us to introduce you to Ombre Layers. You’ll be using your shears to “paint” the hair on the outside of triangular sections to create diffusion and an element of softness. Think of it as creating density at the base that leads into lightness on the ends.

This technique was made for clients with solid, one-length hair that’s crying out for movement and volume. For a very soft removal of weight, try the Professional Blending Shear. Now watch the video and impress your next client with this groundbreaking technique.

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The Easiest Way To Cut Long Layers Throughout The Hair

Easiest Way To Cut Long Layers Throughout The Hair

Looking for the simplest way to cut long layers throughout the hair? Take a diagonal forward section and start in the front because that will be the shortest area. Continue to take parallel sections, bringing everything up to that same guideline so you over-direct and elevate to the same point each time.

Divide the back down the center, go in and lift the last length up so everything comes forward to the stationary guide. See how long you can leave the back with some consistent layering. Easy, right? Easier if you watch the video to see exactly how it’s done.

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How To Add Layers Without Compromising the Perimeter

How To Add Layers Without Compromising the Perimeter

This technique is made for the client who wants layers but also wants to keep her length so she has the option of wearing a ponytail. You’ll always have more hair in the back so what you need to do is protect the front.

To maintain the length, use your comb to take zigzag sections in the back and leave the perimeter weight there. If you want more of a tapered layer, soften vertically with your shears. It’s your choice creatively. Take a look at the video to see exactly how it’s done.

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How To Create Volume in the Crown: Cutting Soft Layers in Longer Hair

How To Create Volume in the Crown Cutting Soft Layers in Longer Hair

We’re going to be seeing a degree of shortness in the crown area again, and using a diamond is the best way to create variations in weight in specific areas, especially over the ear. Four triangles in the crown create the diamond. Elevation is taken across the top of the head parallel to the floor on the opposite side. Finger angle is parallel to the base of the triangle. Once you cut the first triangle, the guideline comes to the center.

What’s cool about the concept of the diamond is that by working with triangles, you’re not getting a massive degree of shortness in the crown. Watch the video, then try it yourself.

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How To Cut Layers Without Making Them Look Choppy

How To Cut Layers Without Making Them Look Choppy

If you have trouble creating layers that don’t look choppy, we’ve got the solution to your problem. It’s all about point-cutting, but you’ve got to know how to do it.

It’s all about the angle of your professional shears. The trick is to stay parallel with the grain of the hair to reduce weight. If you go in at an angle, you release length but end up with a choppy edge. Lift the section up and with your thumb behind your index finger, create a fan of hair before point-cutting. Now watch the video for detailed instructions.

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How To Cut Even Layers When You Wear a Deep Side Part or Side Sweeping Fringe

How To Cut Even Layers When You Wear a Deep Side Part or Side Sweeping Fringe

This is for you if you have clients who complain that one side is longer than the other when they wear a side part. Isolate a section in the front and use a zigzag parting on the next section. Zigzag sectioning is great for creating a nice diffused edge with integrity.

Square the layers off and show the client that you’re cutting the layers even on both sides. Use a blender to soften the sections because these clients want the hair to move. The moment you take a side part that goes back to the crown, the shape of the head creates the illusion of uneven layers. Watch the video and learn how to have this conversation.

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How To Keep Layers Balanced

How To Keep Layers Balanced

Keeping layers balanced, especially on thicker hair, is a challenge, and you’ve got two choices if you’re working off a side part. You can allow a shorter layer to sit on your heavy side, or you can detach longer on one side so when the layers fall they fall to an even point. There are negatives and positives to each decision.

It’s a tough question, but if you go from a side part and detach it on thicker hair, a lot more weight will be sitting on one side. If you cut all your layers balanced across the top, one layer will fall higher and one will fall lower. Watch the video to see how each decision creates a different outcome.

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How To Create Shorter Layers with Movement in the Crown Using a Diamond Section

How To Create Shorter Layers with Movement in the Crown Using a Diamond Section

A cool way to create a square shape on top is working with a diamond. The first step is to section the hair in the crown area and number your diamond so the left front is #1, the right front is #2, the right back is #3 and the left back is #4. You’ll be distributing weight and length in the corners of the diamond so you’ll see a degree of shortness on top.

The idea is to go past the round of the head and cut on a diagonal line. Come back through with your blending shear but with the blunt side down to create a more diffused edge on top. Watch the video for step-by-step instructions.

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Disconnected Layers: Remove Bulk, Keep Length and Speed Up Blow Drying Time

Disconnected Layers: Remove Bulk, Keep Length and Speed Up Blow Drying Time

If you want happy clients, help them reduce the time it takes to blow-dry their hair. One way to do that is to release weight without sacrificing length. We’re talking about the hair in back that they can’t see and can’t work with.

You want to create an under layer, not an undercut. Start by slicing out a zigzag section above the ear and isolating that section. Then, using a professional 7” dry cutting shear, cut on a horizontal line to remove weight in back. Watch the video for detailed instructions about removing bulk while keeping length.

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How To Add Volume in the Crown Without Any Visible Layering

How To Add Volume in the Crown Without Any Visible Layering

It turns out that diamonds are a girl’s best friend, especially when it comes to adding volume on top without sacrificing length. Diamond-shaped sections allow the hair to tilt or move away from the face, creating a sense of volume without over-layering everything.

The size of the diamond is based on the density of the hair. The thicker the hair, the bigger the diamond. Elevate each section and go through and chunk it out. Then come back in with our professional invisiblend shear and see how frothy the top crown will be. Watch the video and start making your clients very, very happy.

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How To Cut Layers Into Dry or Coarse Hair

How To Cut Layers Into Dry or Coarse Hair

It’s always a challenge working with hair that’s very dry because you can see all the lines after you blow-dry the hair. The solution is to cut with horizontal zigzag sections to get the grain of the hair working for you.

Cutting blunt, hard lines into dry or coarse hair only makes things worse. Instead, fan and point-cut deep into each section using a professional 7” dry cutting shear. Watch the video to learn how to turn a problem into a solution.

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Using Triangle Sections to Layer Hair and Create Hidden Volume

Using Triangle Sections to Layer Hair and Create Hidden Volume

We’ve been working with horseshoe sections for a long time, but making triangles of large zigzag sections is a better way to create nice texture that has length and movement. You decide the length of each triangle section and point-cut into it.

Stand on the narrow side or the wide side of the triangle depending on how much weight you want to leave. Want to release a lot of density? Stay on the wide side of the triangle. Watch the video and take a step out of your comfort zone by using the triangle concept instead of taking simple horizontal sections across your horseshoe section. You’re going to love it.

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How to Create Internal Graduation on a Blunt Bob to Collapse the Perimeter

Internal Graduation Blunt Bob

Here’s an easy way to create a graduated bob haircut with a sleek, tucked shape and no visible layers on the top surface. The secret is to place the graduation on the inside of the hairstyle through texturizing. This gives the appearance of a blunt bob with no “short pieces sticking out” but creates a leaner shape that gives a sense of volume.

Starting at the center back of the head, take a vertical section of hair and elevate it to 45 degrees, pointing your fingers down towards the nape of the neck. This graduated cutting line helps to remove bulk from the perimeter and maintain some weight in the middle for a beautiful beveled shape.

Use your Sam Villa Streamline Series 6.75” Shear to point cut into the elevated section, staying nearly parallel to the grain of the hair. When you finish point cutting this section, clip it out of the way and repeat with the rest of the hair (leaving out face-framing sections in the front). Make sure to keep the shears parallel to the hair to avoid adding visible texture to the perimeter.

And that’s it! A gorgeous graduated bob that hugs the head shape and gives the illusion of natural volume. Watch the video to master this internal graduation technique!

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How to Create Seamless Layers on a One Length Bob

Seamless Layers One Length Bob

Want to add volume and movement to a one length haircut? This invisible layering technique makes it easy. Creating a detached diamond-shaped section on top of the head allows you to cut seamless layers for lots of volume at the crown, without taking away length.

Start by creating a center part in dry hair, then sectioning the hair behind the ears on each side. To create your diamond section, rock the comb along the part behind the ear. The place where the comb comes off the head will form one point of your diamond. Repeat at the front of the head by rocking the flat side of the comb along the center part. Use your comb to connect these two points and isolate the hair with a Dry Sectioning Clip. Repeat on the other side of the head.

Then place the flat side of your comb on the crown of the head and find the point where it lifts off the head. Connect this point to the points on each side and isolate the hair on top with a clip. It’s important to let the head shape determine the diamond section, rather than simply drawing a diamond with your comb.

For a diffused edge, use your comb to “zigzag” the front edges of the diamond section. Isolate the hair underneath the section with clips, then separate the diamond section into two triangles along the center part. Elevate one triangle vertically, with your fingers pointing toward the front of the head, and cut the hair shorter in the front and longer towards the back. This graduation creates lots of movement in the bob haircut. The Sam Villa Signature Series Dry Cutting Shear is perfect for this technique, as the long blades allow you to point cut deep into the hair. Repeat on the other side of the diamond section.

There you have it-- a one length bob haircut with tons of fullness and natural movement! Watch the video to add this dry cut technique to your styling arsenal.

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How to Create Invisible Layers or Internal Layers

Invisible Layers

How do you add fullness, movement, and body to a haircut without creating visible layers? In this video you’ll learn how to cut “ghost” layers or invisible layers in thick, medium or fine hair.

To create this reverse layered haircut, section off dry hair behind the ears at the place where the hair density changes. Isolate the front sections of hair on each side with Dry Sectioning Clips. Create a horizontal section of hair at the nape of the neck, and isolate the hair on top with another clip.

Working with vertical 1” pieces, “blouse” the hair to discover its natural bend. Elevate the hair at a 90 degree angle (parallel to the floor) and use your Sam Villa Artist Series 6" Slide Cutting Shears to cut the hair from short to long, beginning at the natural bend point. Apply light tension and “talk” the shear through each section as you cut. The slide cutting shear slips gently through the hair for a soft, diffused finish. Cut from the bottom up to add fullness to fine hair, or from the top down to debulk thick, heavy hair.

Continue layering the entire back section, working up the head in horizontal subsections. (Be mindful of hair growth patterns at the crown to avoid creating a cowlick.) Then isolate the back section of hair with a clip and repeat this process with the front sections on each side. Take out the clips, comb and tousle the hair, finish with Redken Shine Flash 02 and you’re done!

This style is perfect for your guests who want some volume and movement, but don’t want the appearance of layered hair. Watch the video to learn how to create invisible layered haircuts in all hair types!

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How to Create Invisible Layers - Zigzag Underlayering

Zigzag Layers

Looking for a way to add a silhouette to long, thick hair while maintaining the length your guests want? Try this creative technique to de-bulk heavy hair with invisible or “ghost” layers.

To create this reverse layered haircut, prep wet hair with Redken’s One United and section off the hair in front of the ears on each side. Create a horizontal section at the crown of the head. To ensure the hair on top is thick enough to conceal the invisible layers underneath, check to see if your comb is visible under this section. If you can clearly see the comb through the hair, add additional hair.

Creating a zigzag parting is the key to achieving invisible layers with no hard lines. Holding the crown section in one hand, use your comb to lift a small piece of hair from the lower section and add it to the crown section. Then pick up a piece of hair from the crown section and bring it down to the lower section.

Alternate between the upper and lower sections as you move across the head. It’s important to work with purpose and intention as you plan the zigzag. Because the hair in the crown section will not be cut, consider adding larger sections of hair from low-density areas to the upper section. Long, vertical zigzags will result in a softer, more diffuse boundary.

Once you have created a horizontal zigzag part across the head, clip the top section of hair out of the way. Pick up a guide from the “peak” of a zigzag, cut the guide, and separate a small vertical subsection of hair. Elevate the hair up against the head and cut it to the length of the guide. Repeat with the next zigzag, matching the new guide to the length of the first one. This helps ensure even layers if your zigzags aren’t perfectly balanced. Continue this process as you work your way around the head.

Before you take out the clips, blow dry the lower section to make sure you have the shape you want. The volume should collapse against the nape of the neck, allowing the hair on top to hug the head shape.

Your long-haired guests will love these invisible layers, but don’t forget to explain what you’re doing and why! Great communication adds value behind the chair and gives your guest confidence in you and her hairstyle. Watch the video to learn how to cut zigzag ghost layers in long, thick hair.

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How to Create Volume and Movement in Fine Hair

How to Create Volume and Movement in Fine Hair

Wondering how to add movement and volume to fine hair? Blending makes fine hair even finer, so it’s tricky to create layered haircuts for thin hair without losing the perimeter. Blond hair is especially challenging because the lines we create are more visible!

Here’s a clever way to solve these problems: Begin with DRY hair and a middle part. Place the spine of your comb on the part and rock it back and forth near the hairline. Note the spot where the comb comes off at the hairline, place a finger there, and use your comb to draw an “umbrella” line down towards the back of the head. Make sure there is enough density below the line-- this will support the layers you create!

Comb over your line with the wide teeth of your comb, then place the teeth against the head and “zigzag” the comb up and down. Slice your finger through the hair where the section was parted, and lift up the top section. Repeat on the other side of the head (adding another zigzag in the back if needed) and isolate this top section with clips. Bring the rest of the hair around to the back and clip it in a low ponytail at the nape of the neck.

Now unclip the top section and pick up a small vertical subsection next to the center part. Elevate the hair vertically so that the hair is at a 90 degree angle to the head and your fingers are parallel to the head shape. Point cut into the hair with your Sam Villa Signature Series Dry Cutting Swivel Shear at a diagonal to the hair’s grain. Using the cut section as a guide and following the curve of the head, continue working through the crown in vertical subsections.

When the entire top section has been layered, comb through all the hair and elevate it vertically. Hold the hair at mid-shaft in one hand and point cut into the entire section to clean up any extra-long pieces. Then take out the clips, comb through the hair, and use the Sam Villa Signature Series Invisiblend Shear to blend out any visible lines on the hair’s surface.

The result is a beautiful silhouette, the illusion of more volume in the hair, and no “choppy” layers! Watch the video for more tips on creating volume in fine hair, including why you should do a dry cut for this hair type and how to get the best results blending while preserving the perimeter. Your fine-haired guests will love this!

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Two Ways to Fix Choppy Layers

Choppy Layers

What do you do when your layers come out looking heavy, blocky or shelfy? Don’t panic, with the right techniques it IS possible to fix choppy layers and readjust the weight in your haircut.

It’s important to start by isolating the “problem area” where the choppy layer sits in the hair. Once you separate this vertical section, elevate the hair up to about 45 degrees. The elevation will help you visualize where the extra weight lives. Fan out the ends of the section and point cut some of the weight out with the Sam Villa Signature Series Dry Cutting Swivel Shear.

Now drop the section back down and reassess. If a choppy layer is still visible, elevate the section a little higher, to about 60 degrees. This will reveal a blocky or heavy corner if one is present. Again, fan out the section and point cut the ends, then drop the section back into place. Repeat this process as needed until the layer blends well with the surrounding hair. Then elevate the hair straight up to 90 degrees and point cut into the ends to remove any corner that remains. Drop the section back down, comb through the hair, and make sure the final shape is just right!

But what if you need to remove weight without changing the silhouette and making the upper layers too short? With the right tool, it can be done! Once you separate and elevate the problem section, remove weight from the interior with your Sam Villa Signature Series Invisiblend Shear. Drop the section into place and reassess the weight balance. If needed, elevate the section a bit higher and use the Invisiblend to selectively de-bulk the layer. (You may need to drop the surface-level piece of hair to avoid creating wispy ends.)

And that’s it! No matter which technique you choose, a slow and methodical approach helps you avoid removing too much hair. Watch the video to learn how to fix long or short choppy layers!

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3. Face-Framing Techniques

Every great piece of art deserves the perfect frame. Every day, the first thing your guests see is the front of their haircut and how it affects their face shape. The right face-framing technique can accentuate their best features or take the focus away from areas they want to hide.

Within this section of our video guide, you will find options for different hair textures as well as creative possibilities that are easy to apply in the salon.

1. How To Easily Frame Hair Around the Face Using a Twist Cutting Technique
2. Face-Framing Technique: Add Texture Without Removing Length
3. Simple Face-Framing Technique: Front Twist Cutting Technique
4. Adding Face-Framing Layers to Fine Hair to Accentuate Features
5. How to Create Face-Framing Layers with a Razor
6. Long Layers with Face Framing
7. Face Framing Tutorial on a Short Bob
8. How to Cut Face Framing Layers
9. Face Framing Technique For Adding Texture Without Removing Length


How To Easily Frame Hair Around the Face Using a Twist Cutting Technique

How To Easily Frame Hair Around the Face Using a Twist Cutting Technique

Looking for an easy way to frame hair around the face without making one side look shorter? We’ve got two solutions to that problem.

One is to start with a center part and create three points of reference. There’s also another way that utilizes a wide-tooth comb and professional 7” dry cutting shears, which allows you gather a lot of hair at one time. It’s all about combing and elevating the hair before your cutting hand starts the action.

Watch the video to find out how easy it is to get an angle that goes from short to long and will be consistent on both sides.

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Face-Framing Technique: Add Texture Without Removing Length

Face-Framing Technique: Add Texture Without Removing Length

Want to add texture and movement around the face without taking away length or adding excess layers to the haircut? You’ve come to the right place.

Grab a pair of professional 7” dry cutting shears. The blade is designed to hold the hair so you’re not pushing it out of the shear while you cut. Find your reference point and take a horizontal finger position there. Come in from behind and place your thumb in the shear. Now open and close as you talk your way down the hair strand to the perimeter.

Watch the video and learn to master the technique.

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Simple Face-Framing Technique: Front Twist Cutting Technique

Simple Face-Framing Technique Front Twist Cutting Technique

Want to achieve a balanced angle in the front from short to long? A new category of twist cutting is designed to do just that.

Separate front to back on both sides. Use a large cutting comb to comb the hair forward toward you. Start with your cutting hand, establishing where you want the length. Come through, pointing your fingers down. Now bring your left hand directly over that and continue to twist. Then cut a horizontal line with your dry cutting shears. Once you release you’ll have the angle working from short to long on both sides in one cut.

Watch the video and learn how to do it yourself.

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Adding Face-Framing Layers to Fine Hair to Accentuate Features

Adding Face-Framing Layers to Fine Hair to Accentuate Features

Adding layers to fine hair without creating wispy ends around the face is a common problem. The idea is to strengthen the ends, so instead of elevating, you’re going to create defined pieces that will provide more density and create the illusion of fullness.

The key is to find a focal point, say the cheekbones or jawline, and highlight that area. First, take the front edge and pinch a little piece of hair forward. Don’t slide-cut back and away from the face. Instead, come in from behind and talk the shears forward to the focal point for a pop of visual interest.

Watch the video and get the whole story.

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How to Create Face-Framing Layers with a Razor

How to Create Face-Framing Layers with a Razor

Want to create face-framing layers with a highly textured feel in one step? The Sam Villa 6-Gap Texturizing Blade makes it easy. Since you’ll be working on dry hair, prep the hair with Redken Shine Flash 02 glistening mist to add a bit of slide.

Now, take a diagonal section through the fringe area and over-direct it to the opposite cheekbone. Maintain a 45-degree elevation and have a finger angle that’s perpendicular to the grain of the hair. Use a light, gentle stroking motion back and forth on each section until you remove the desired amount of hair. Multiple cuts will produce the softness and movement you want, and it’s fine to have a little detachment from guide to guide.

Watch the video and see how a combination of over-direction, elevation and finger angle can make a difference in your results.

Back to Face-Framing Techniques | Back to Main Index


Long Layers with Face Framing

Long Layers with Face Framing

Education Director for Sam Villa Andrew Carruthers shares a simple way to create a long layered haircut with face framing that is adaptable to different hair types and densities.

Discover how to create airy layers in this full haircut demonstration, including a sectioning technique called the Foundational Breakdown with this in-depth haircutting tutorial.

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Face Framing Tutorial on a Short Bob

Face Framing Short Bob

Haircuts that are much shorter in length such as a short bob, can make a client feel like they have too much hair around their face.

Jesse Linares from the Sam Villa ArTeam shares a slide cutting technique that will help hair stylists open up the haircut around their salon guest's face. He will also share how to do this without taking away from the strong lines of a short bob that we love.

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Face Framing Technique For Adding Texture Without Removing Length

Face Framing Technique For Adding Texture Without Removing Length

Andrew Carruthers, education director for Sam Villa® addresses a commonly asked question from our clients with longer hair, "Can you frame my face without losing length or adding layers?"

Watch as Andrew takes us through this technique to give the client exactly what they are asking for.

Back to Face-Framing Techniques | Back to Main Index


How to Cut Face Framing Layers

Face Framing Layers

Discover how to cut face framing layers using diagonal sections and high elevation for an extremely soft face framing haircut!

Sam Villa creates an approach that is easy to replicate and creates predictable results.

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4. How to Cut Bangs

Bangs (you may prefer to call them a fringe) are a must-have accessory for any classic or trendy haircut.. A thoughtfully created, skillfully executed fringe is not easy though!

By studying the videos in this section, you will not only feel more confident but also have an incredible library of concepts to recommend that perfect bang to any salon guest.

1. Blending Shear Backstroke Technique: Remove Weight & Add Volume
2. How To Cut and Finish a Full Fringe
3. How To Cut a Side Sweeping Fringe
4. Cutting The Perfect Fringe Using The Twist Bang Cut Technique
5. The Michelle Williams Fringe
6. How To Cut A No-Tension Full Fringe:  Zoey Deschanel Bangs Tutorial
7. 2 Ways to Cut Bangs: Side Sweeping Fringe and Chunky Textured Fringe
8. Statement Fringe: How To Cut Short Full Bangs
9. How To Cut Angled Bangs: The Asymmetrical Layered Fringe
10. How To Cut Fringe with Reverse Graduation
11. Removing Weight From a Heavy Fringe
12. How To Cut Balanced Blunt Bangs
13. How to Cut Short Bangs, Baby Bangs, Baby Fringe or Statement Fringe
14. Curtain Fringe - Curtain Bangs How-To with Horizontal Sections
15. How to Cut Short Bangs with Lots of Texture - Baby Fringe
16. How to Cut Side Sweeping Bangs to Wear to Either Side - Double Side Fringe


Blending Shear Backstroke Technique: Remove Weight & Add Volume

Blending Shear Backstroke Technique Remove Weight & Add Volume

Here’s an efficient way to remove weight and add volume in the fringe area. We call it the Blending Shear Backstroke Technique. Start by taking a diagonal forward slice. Now, over-direct the hair so it moves back and away from the face. Place the blunt blade of the Sam Villa Invisiblend Shear in the hair on the diagonal and weave it through. Now close, backstroke, open, close, backstroke and release the section.

That’s all there is to it. Watch the video to master a technique designed to control movement around the perimeter edge.

How to Cut Bangs & Style Fringe | Back to Main Index


How To Cut and Finish a Full Fringe

How To Cut and Finish a Full Fringe

Looking for a foolproof technique to cut a deep fringe with a natural bevel? Our Sam Villa Signature Series 7” Dry Cutting Shears create less margin for error because you’re not opening and closing them as frequently. Dry cutting also lets you more accurately determine the correct length.

Keeping a wide-tooth comb flat to the forehead, drop the hair deep into the teeth, come in with your dry cutting shear and establish your guide. Cut on the left side and repeat on the right. Our advice: Never leave fringes one length. Watch the video and eliminate the guessing game of how much of the corner to cut off.

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How To Cut a Side Sweeping Fringe

How To Cut a Side Sweeping Fringe

You have seen Sam create a balanced fringe with a "twist-cutting" technique, now watch as he adapts the technique to achieve a beautiful side-sweeping fringe!

A key element to creating any side-sweeping fringe is making sure that you are working with the guest's natural part. By placing your body off center when twisting, it builds strong over-direction that easily produces that natural sweeping movement you are looking for. Watch as Sam also gives you an easy way to find your guest's natural part.

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How to Cut Bangs & Style Fringe - Cutting The Perfect Fringe Using The Twist Bang Cut Technique

Cutting The Perfect Fringe Using The Twist Bang Cut Technique

Now here’s a technique that comes with plenty of fringe benefits. Twist Cutting lets you create perfect bangs with a degree of shortness in the center that perfectly frame the face. Cutting the hair dry allows you to judge the length accordingly. Start from the high point of the head to the corner of the eyes, and remember that you have a creative choice when it comes to how heavy you want that fringe to be.

Work with your large cutting comb, stabilizing each section with the fine teeth underneath. Come in with no elevation, keeping your hand close to the head. Now twist, cut and release. Watch the video to learn how to execute this groundbreaking technique for yourself.

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The Michelle Williams Fringe

The Michelle Williams Fringe

Duplicate actress Michelle Williams's classic pixie fringe, while giving the fringe multiple identities. To create the first look, which has a rock 'n' roll feel, use the Sam Villa Signature Series 7” Dry Cutting Shear to cut the hair barely off the skin but as close to the natural fall as possible. Maintain a low elevation so the bangs don’t become wispy, and point-cut the length away, working very visually. Using the still blade on the shear, whittle the hair away to create peaks and valleys and some open spaces.

To channel classic Hollywood chic, simply comb the hair to the opposite side so the longer hair tucks in nicely. Now watch the video to learn how to create a fringe with multiple personalities.

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How To Cut A No-Tension Full Fringe: Zoey Deschanel Bangs Tutorial

How To Cut A No-Tension Full Fringe Zoey Deschanel Bangs Tutorial

There's nothing like a really full fringe to awaken a shape, but cutting those fringes dry lets you control the growth patterns. Another trick is to work with a center part, combing the hair forward in a natural falling position. The fringe will tell you where it wants to split when you push it up. You’ll be working with a rectangular shape and using a wide-tooth comb so you have no tension.

Fringes are very temperamental, but by using your middle finger as a cutting board, you’ll get a more relaxed fringe. The perfect fringe is never one length, and you’re not home free until you bevel the fringe by knocking the corner off. Watch the video to master the technique that would make Zoey Deschanel proud.

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2 Ways to Cut Bangs: Side Sweeping Fringe and Chunky Textured Fringe

2 Ways to Cut Bangs Side Sweeping Fringe and Chunky Textured Fringe

Taylor Swift and Britney Spears have been working side-sweeping fringes of late. Move the fringe from one side to the other, and suddenly it’s got a whole new identity. This is where your blending shears come in handy. Use them to release the length with a soft edge, cutting the fringe on the bias so it has the ability to move.

Another trend we're seeing is a fringe that looks like it's been vandalized. You know what we’re talking about: chewy texture with lots of density woven in. Use your blending shears to take large and deliberate pieces out. Cut diagonally in the opposite direction and watch how the different textures play against one another. We break it all down for you in the video.

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Statement Fringe: How To Cut Short Full Bangs

Statement Fringe How To Cut Short Full Bangs

Statement fringes are having a moment, but creating surface texture on really dense hair when working this close to the hairline can be a challenge. Grab your Sam Villa Signature Series 5-3/4” Shears and go a little shorter, using a point-cutting technique to freehand in the fringe.

Now switch to the professional invisiblend shear. Come in at a slight diagonal to the hair strand, close and slide through to eliminate some of the bulk. Now go for that visual surface interest by grabbing what you want to cut and talking the shears down the hair strand. Watch the video and learn how to get aggressive with your fringes to get that vandalized texture that’s right on trend.

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How To Cut Angled Bangs: The Asymmetrical Layered Fringe

How To Cut Angled Bangs The Asymmetrical Layered Fringe

An asymmetrical layered fringe creates a lot of movement with a nice tilt for a focal point. The key is to layer first and then refine your perimeter. Using your professional 7” dry cutting shears, point-cut in your cutting line to mimic the head shape. Point-cut to the guide, over-directing back to the stationary guide. Keep over-directing back to the stationary guide and follow the head shape to build up a lot of length to the left.

Now come in and refine the perimeter. This is where you have options. Do you leave it a bit longer or really make a statement by going shorter? Watch the video and see exactly how it’s done.

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How To Cut Fringe with Reverse Graduation

How To Cut Fringe with Reverse Graduation

Here's a cool way to create a fringe with a sense of fullness but disrupted texture around the edges. Start from the inside and work your way out. Pick up your professional 7” dry cutting shears and point-cut, scanning as you work across the first section, elevating diagonally as you scan the second section.

Next, elevate to the guideline and keep your finger angle behind the guide so you can go deeper into the third section. Keeping the shears at a diagonal, establish the length. When you release the weight, your shears will be perpendicular to the desired length and you'll start to see a chewed-up edge. Now come in and bevel the fringe. The video breaks it down for you.

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Removing Weight From a Heavy Fringe

Removing Weight From a Heavy Fringe

Finding out you’ve left too much weight in the fringe after you blow-dry the hair is frustrating. Fixing the problem is easy if you figure out where the density lives. A common mistake is to texturize the surface because the problem is usually on the inside.

Grab your professional invisiblend shears. You can be very aggressive with this shear without seeing any lines in your haircut. The weight usually comes from the lower section so come in underneath, pull the shear away and remove small amounts of hair. With each section you’re going to float out a little farther away from the scalp so you don’t get any jumpers as you get close to the surface.

Watch the video to learn how to start from the inside out when addressing density.

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How To Cut Balanced Blunt Bangs

How To Cut Balanced Blunt Bangs

Discover how to cut blunt bangs using 3 guide pieces which help to keep the heavy straight line balanced and even side to side.

Sam Villa ArTeam member, Jesse Linares goes in depth with a bang tutorial that answers every question you may have about how to cut the perfect blunt bang.

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How to Cut Short Bangs, Baby Bangs, Baby Fringe or Statement Fringe

How To Cut Short Bangs, Baby Bangs, Baby Fringe, Statement Fringe

Learning how to cut short bangs with intention and purpose is the difference between a rockin choppy baby bang and something that looks like a #quarantinecut gone wrong.

Our Sam Villa ArTeam Member, Jesse Linares is an absolute pro at these more dramatic looks and walks you through how to establish a highly textured perimeter and then add a touch of softness to make it more wearable.

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Curtain Fringe - Curtain Bangs How-To with Horizontal Sections

Twist Fringe Bangs

Whether you call it curtain fringe or curtain bangs, this popular hair cut can be approached in many different ways.

By using horizontal sections you have perfect control over the perimeter shape and the addition of cutting sections at 90 degree elevation adds texture and softness.

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How to Cut Short Bangs with Lots of Texture - Baby Fringe

Texture Fringe Bangs

Discover how to cut short bangs with lots of texture in this baby fringe tutorial!

Super short bangs and fringe are a big trend currently but they can be tricky.

Follow along as Education Director, Andrew Carruthers shows how to create a balanced perimeter with loose texture without over-texturizing.

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How to Cut Side Sweeping Bangs to Wear to Either Side - Double Side Fringe

How to Cut Side Sweeping Bangs to Wear to Either Side

The Double Side Fringe teaches you how to cut bangs to be worn on either side.

Some guests want the versatility to change their part day to day and Sam's technique keeps visual balance regardless of what side the hair is parted.

Watch as he gives you a simple technique to find the natural parting on both sides. Using a blending shear helps create a soft edge for even more versatility.

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