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Fringe, Perimeter & Layering - 4 Hair Cutting Techniques You Should Learn

Lya Navarra

Author Lya Navarra


    Have you ever thought to yourself, "There has to be a better way to do this!" Take a step back for a moment and really think about what it is you want to accomplish in the easiest way possible.

    We here at Sam Villa are all about approaching hair in different ways not only to keep things fresh, yet, to offer solutions for everyday problems encountered behind the chair.

    These next three video clips are sure to please with solutions to cutting fringe, creating a solid bottom edge and creating movement in the crown area. All of these techniques can be incorporated into the cuts you are already creating.

    Watch, listen and discover!

    3 Ways to cut a side sweeping fringe

    It doesn’t get any better than a classic side-sweeping fringe to flatter any face shape. The only variations would be the length your guest desires and the consideration of the density of the hair as well as the amount of texture within the end result. As more and more guests inquire about fringe it’s important to own these three simple techniques to offer this timeless look.

    We utilize the Sam Villa Signature Series Reversible Blending Shear for all the three techniques. This shear is the perfect choice for removing length, all while maintaining a soft perimeter edge. The 42 radial teeth will remove a good amount of hair and eliminates blunt lines. The “V” indents at the end of each tooth catch and hold the hair as well as add to the diffused line.

    Fine Density – Low Elevation

    Fine hair needs weight to move and supporting our sections at a low elevation will ensure less removal of weight.

    1. For minimal tension and for cutting at low elevation use the wide toothed end of the Sam Villa Signature Series Cutting Comb in black for light hair or ivory for darker hair.
    2. Determine the natural part and comb the hair to the opposite side.
    3. Approach the fringe area from underneath and allow the hair to drop into the wide teeth of the comb.
    4. Move into the section with the teeth of the shear facing the face.
      HOT TIP – For any blending or texturizing shear, the hair will be influenced in the direction the teeth are facing
    5. Determine the amount of length to be removed and cut the line in simply by opening and closing the blade.
    6. End result is a heavy fringe with a favorable soft edge and weight maintained for movement.
    Medium Density – Elevation and Over Direction

    Medium hair will withstand a more layered texture to give the hair more movement by using slight elevation and over direction for a short to long sweep.

    1. Approach the fringe section from the opposite side you want the fringe to fall.
    2. Stationary guide - Part out a diagonal section and hold your fingers on the same diagonal, parallel to the diagonal parting.
    3. Keep the elevation low, anywhere from approximately 25 to 45 degrees.
    4. Determine the amount of length to be removed and cut the line in simply by opening and closing the blade.
    5. Repeat numbers 2, 3 and 4 throughout the fringe area ensuring your finger angle is parallel to the diagonal parting, then over-direct to the stationary guide
    6. The over direction will create the short to long soft edged weight line
    Thick Density – Higher Elevation and Over Direction

    Increasing the elevation will result in a more layered effect to the shape of the fringe

    1. Approach the fringe section from the opposite side you want the fringe to fall.
    2. Stationary guide - Part out a diagonal section and hold your fingers on the same diagonal, parallel to the diagonal parting and elevate the section to 90 degrees, straight out from the head.
    3. Determine the amount of length to be removed and cut the line in simply by opening and closing the blade.
    4. Repeat numbers 2, 3 and 4 throughout the fringe area ensuring your finger angle is parallel to the diagonal parting, elevation is at 90 degrees and over-direct to the stationary guide.

     

    How to cut hair straight | Creating a precision bottom edge

    Have you ever discovered inconsistencies in your bottom edge after you blow-dry a Bob or a longer cut? It’s common and we want to share tips on taking control for a more precise outcome that will save time.

    After your cut is blown dry you may find a bit of graduation in the bottom edge, let’s get into why:

    3 Common Challenges

    To ensure a solid precision bottom edge it’s vital to be sure the hair is cut as close as possible to its natural fall.

    1. Placing Fingers Into the Section
      If we place our fingers into the area of the section to be cut we automatically introduce a little graduation. Be cautious not to lift the section upward, instead be sure the fingers are as parallel as possible to each other with the bottoms of the fingers facing in a downward direction.
    2. Not at Eye Level to the Section
      If we are not at eye level to the area of the section to be cut we have a natural tendency to bend the section upward with our fingers resulting in elevation. Pump that chair up or have your longer haired guests stand up to ensure you are at eye level to your cutting section.
    3. Cutting into the Stationary Guide
      Stay mindful of the stationary guide by bringing each cutting section down and removing length ever so slightly below the stationary guide rather than directly on top of the stationary guide.

    Hot Tips

    • Be watchful of the curvature of the head as you release and comb through your sections before releasing length. The curvature of the head causes swelling as you blow the cut in relation to the hair below the curvature, the length will be more even, you’ll see!
    • DON’T MISS THE END - Check out how Andrew introduces a Comb to keep the hair in its natural fall.

     

    Creating consistent weight balance while layering hair

    One of the most common challenges we face in layering the hair is inconsistencies in the angles we administer as the hair is pulled out from the head.

    Check out Andrew as he explains:

    1. How important it is to be conscious of consistency in the degree of the angle.
    2. The importance of being conscious about body positioning – your heavy side and your light side – big aha moment here!
    3. Why large sections will give you an unbalanced outcome.
    4. Checking your elevation at the scalp area with each section will keep you on track and in control of the shape.

    We challenge you to be conscious of the element of elevation with your layering to be as consistent as possible for the best outcome!

     

    How to create shorter layers with movement in the crown using a diamond section

    Diamonds. Still a girls’ best friend? You bet!

    Utilizing a diamond section in the crown area influences more of a square shape. It allows us to create degrees of short to long for movement back away from the face by distributing areas of length and weight in the corners of the diamond.

    This technique easily transforms a cut into shorter crown layers without disturbing length. The lines are cut using the Sam Villa Signature Series Reversible Blending Shear, not a blunt shear, ensuring diffused ends to the entire diamond section.

    Follow Sam as he divides the diamond into four triangles. Over direction and finger angle are your keys to success for incorporating this shape into a cut that begs for a shorter crown without compromising length!